Tag Archives: TV

‘The Newsroom’ satisfies my need for a news show that’s newsy. Watch it bomb.

Think about it: When was the last time there was a good, long-running show about a newsroom? “Murphy Brown” comes to mind, and that ended before I lost all of my baby teeth. One could make a case for the fifth season of “The Wire,” but again, that ended a while ago. Thankfully, now there’s the bluntly named “The Newsroom.”

It’s in good hands with Aaron Sorkin, because a newsroom is just one big walk-and-talk, anyway.

There are reviews here, here and here (which range from “well worth watching” to “preachy and from a writer who still can’t write roles for women”) from various writers and all giving a general synopsis of the show and rundown of characters. But I’m judging the show on the quality of its journalism. It does well. Continue reading

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What a Media Junkie Feeds On

Writing about my media monitoring habits sheds light on the fact I’m a man of relatively narrow interests. If I’m not reading news, I’m reading about news coverage. Maybe it’s not making me a well-rounded person, but that’s for a therapist to tell me.

Acting as an enabler in this process is Media Decoder over at The New York Times. It’s kind of a go-to for middle-of-the-road analysis for everything media related, from how badly Fox News bungled an interview with Newt Gingrich to whether or not Oprah’s network will ever be watched by people other than those who have shows on it.

I began following Mashable long before Dan Kennedy included it in his class’ must-read selection. They’re all about “new” media and probably waiting for the final nail to be forced into the coffin of the printed word. Their media section is, however, a favorite of mine for lists like X reasons why journalists should use this-website-I-haven’t-heard-of-until-now.

One of the good things to come out of Facebook’s Subscribe feature was my new interest in Jeff Sonderman. The Poynter Institute digital media fellow isn’t as anti-“old” media as others and that’s a good thing. But his posts still include a lot about good and bad changes in the industry thanks to the Internet. Sonderman’s coverage is a little less insider-oriented than Poynter’s own Mediawire, which I also closely monitor – especially when there’s news about the Tribune bankruptcy or something like that.

Finally, Howard Kurtz, longtime Washington Post columnist and now a member of the fledgling Daily Beast and its Newsweek subsidiary, is always worth a glancing at when his face comes up on TweetDeck. I regularly question his analysis, but who said anything about always agreeing with the people you read? Not that I ever disagree with Media Nation and thoroughly respect the ground its author walks on …

Photo: Wikimedia Commons/Jfurrer

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Introduction

It doesn’t take a news junkie to notice the twists and turns in the media industry today. What it does is a close analysis on how people cover information, how technology is turning the industry upside down and how everyone – not just journalists – are able to be increasingly involved in the processes of newsgathering and information sharing.

For a purist and a news junkie like myself, this media revolution is both fascinating and confusing. I used to resist giving bloggers and anything that wasn’t a traditional print or broadcast organization much credit because I saw questionable practices being used. In reality, I was giving the old guards too much credit and it’s wrong to ignore the power bloggers (Brian Stelter and Nate Silver come instantly to mind) and committed Tweeters have , and they assets they give to existing news outlets.

I am a senior journalism student at Northeastern University who has worked for both student newspapers, small local newspapers and online-only publications. Working in companies of various sizes and structures has allowed me to see the successes and struggles different approaches to media face today. And as a journalism student, it’s immensely interesting. Thanks to Twitter, I spend a lot of time following the headlines, monitoring everything from traditional newspapers like The New York Times and Los Angeles Times, to online firms like Slate.

Don’t get me wrong, print still has a place in the media landscape. But sitting back and blogging during this industry’s world during a revolution is a thrill.

 

 

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