Tag Archives: journalism

‘The Newsroom’ satisfies my need for a news show that’s newsy. Watch it bomb.

Think about it: When was the last time there was a good, long-running show about a newsroom? “Murphy Brown” comes to mind, and that ended before I lost all of my baby teeth. One could make a case for the fifth season of “The Wire,” but again, that ended a while ago. Thankfully, now there’s the bluntly named “The Newsroom.”

It’s in good hands with Aaron Sorkin, because a newsroom is just one big walk-and-talk, anyway.

There are reviews here, here and here (which range from “well worth watching” to “preachy and from a writer who still can’t write roles for women”) from various writers and all giving a general synopsis of the show and rundown of characters. But I’m judging the show on the quality of its journalism. It does well. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Student journalism is worth the rising costs

This might surprise the technologically inclined, but most college students don’t expect their campus news on a phone or tablet – they find it printed on newspaper.

Editors say over and over that students get news by stumbling across their college newspaper and flipping through it casually, or seeking out their friend who might be in a picture or mentioned in a story. It’s not a regular habit to seek it out on a website or like it on Facebook.

In my interviews with some Boston college paper editors, they say they’re still experimenting with online strategies. But their hands may be forced soon as university budgets make newspapers a costly proposition.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Journalism in China is “almost like playing a video game”

Wu Nan, March 29, at Northeastern University

Based on Nieman fellow Wu Nan’s testimony about her work in Chinese journalism, being a reporter in that country has similar appeal as eating fire. Remember, some people like that stuff.

Wu’s work at various sites, including The Wall Street Journal’s Chinese site, gave her insight into the difficulty that nation’s reporters face in reporting every day news, she said to about 50 Northeastern students. She also said the emergence of social media in the area, from Facebook and Twitter knockoffs, has become crucial to the reporting process.

Wu’s roughly 35-minute discussion was kind of insider journalism discussion, but her experience reflected her talent in navigating censorship and disclosure restrictions, something journalists in every state have to face. But she described it as kind of a thrill, suggesting, to me anyway, she was interested in reporting that was challenging.

As China increasingly becomes a more important country, it makes sense to understand the ability of their reporters in covering the national news. On the face of it, it sounds like China embraces citizen journalism because it’s already a backbone of the journalism scene there.

Wu doesn’t mind, though. She thinks Chinese journalism is like a maze in a video game – and a great challenge.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Link Like a Gentleman

The person who thought of putting hyperlinks in a story probably thought it was a great idea. He or she wondered if there could be a way to find other Web pages that had information about a given topic or could provide more context to the story and embed them in the online copy. But to be honest, I’ve never really clicked on hyperlinks. In fact, I usually rollover them just to see where they link to. And really, linking to stories is no more than a courtesy to the reader. Sort of a handshake agreement that the writer or editor will aid your reading experience, right?

Maybe not. Mathew Ingram of GigaOM wrote and did a Storify last weekend on a spat between The Wall Street Journal and MG Siegler of Tech Crunch after he apparently broke the story Apple was buying app-discovery service Chomp. Siegler was miffed the Journal didn’t link to him in their own story after they confirmed of Apple’s purchase. Actually, miffed is a polite way to describe his rant on his own Tumblr.

Ultimately, Siegler thinks WSJ should have given him and Tech Crunch props for being first on the story, by at the very least linking to his story. What the Journal really did was re-report the story, probably based on what Siegler reported earlier in the day. I know I’ve written things that were later picked up by another publication without so much as a mention to me, and that’s OK. What’s not OK is to blatantly rip off someone’s story. That’s not what the WSJ did here.

Siegler’s probably overreacting, but Ingram raises a good question: What is good linking protocol? I say linking is to give readers reputable sources of information to provide greater context. Newspapers are notably stingy on doing this, usually linking just to their own stories about the topic. That’s not bad journalism, but it’s inconvenient. Mind you, I’m not one to click on links when in the middle of a story, but it’s worth going back and seeing what other information I can get out of an article. Linking is just polite, plain and simple. It’s one of those things that’s appreciated and helpful to some readers.

Siegler should really cool his jets and not boycott WSJ links out of spite. But WSJ and other outlets should do some more reporting and at least begin to acknowledge other outlets (and Tech Crunch is no small outfit) reporting news well ahead of them. That would be gentleman-like of them.

Photo: Flickr/buddawiggi

Tagged , , , , , ,

Introduction

It doesn’t take a news junkie to notice the twists and turns in the media industry today. What it does is a close analysis on how people cover information, how technology is turning the industry upside down and how everyone – not just journalists – are able to be increasingly involved in the processes of newsgathering and information sharing.

For a purist and a news junkie like myself, this media revolution is both fascinating and confusing. I used to resist giving bloggers and anything that wasn’t a traditional print or broadcast organization much credit because I saw questionable practices being used. In reality, I was giving the old guards too much credit and it’s wrong to ignore the power bloggers (Brian Stelter and Nate Silver come instantly to mind) and committed Tweeters have , and they assets they give to existing news outlets.

I am a senior journalism student at Northeastern University who has worked for both student newspapers, small local newspapers and online-only publications. Working in companies of various sizes and structures has allowed me to see the successes and struggles different approaches to media face today. And as a journalism student, it’s immensely interesting. Thanks to Twitter, I spend a lot of time following the headlines, monitoring everything from traditional newspapers like The New York Times and Los Angeles Times, to online firms like Slate.

Don’t get me wrong, print still has a place in the media landscape. But sitting back and blogging during this industry’s world during a revolution is a thrill.

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,