Tag Archives: facebook

Who cares what you like to read?

I have The Washington Post’s social reader installed on by Facebook account. Why? Good question.

It seemed like a good idea at the time, but the more I saw my friend’s messages floating down my feed, I saw what kinds of articles they were reading. Or probably clicking on by mistake.

The idea behind the social reader isn’t far-fetched, I’ll give it that. I share tons and tons of stories to people I know aren’t clicking on them. At most, they retweet or throw a story on their Facebook news feed. If people reply or leave comments, that’s just an interesting side note. But the whole point is that it’s a selective process.

Installing a social reader in your Facebook account is a little different.

The point of it is to show people what you’re reading, but it turns into a map of cheesy things you click on – and might not want others to know about. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen the bro-iest of guys confess they’ve “read” about Snooki’s pregnancy thanks to the Post’s reader. I’m sure (or I hope) it was out of morbid curiosity, not because they’re really interested in what the “Jersey Shore” personality (that’s being kind) is doing.

I know there are ways to turn these settings off, but it defeats the mission of the product. But a social reader, to me, answers a question nobody was asking. Really, how hard is it to type 120 characters and add a link on your own?

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New media grows up by changing old guards

The news Chris Hughes scooped up the long-suffering political magazine The New Republic earlier this month took me by surprise. Not so much that Hughes – Mark Zuckerberg’s old Harvard roommate and one of Facebook’s founders – spent money on a company peddling a print product, but that The New Republic was still around. Quite simply, I’d forgotten about the magazine in the first place.

It’s always flown under the radar, but The New Republic has long been the reading of liberal politicians – and few others.

Already, Hughes is making his mark. Today, The New Republic’s staff announced it was disassembling part of its paywall.

Continue reading

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Liking and friending on new platforms

I stand by my original motivation behind pursuing print journalism: I want to report and share news with people, but I don’t want to be on camera. Unlike broadcasters, I don’t want to hear my voice or get covered in makeup to appear on camera.

But the days of hiding behind my byline are over, thanks to the Internet. And I’m being told time and again that a social media presence is a journalist’s best friend. Really? In the last couple of weeks, I’ve been introduced to different platforms that are supposedly brilliant for journalists. If only I knew why.

Vadim Lavrusik, Facebook’s journalism program manager, has been cluttering my news feed with ways to use Timeline. After getting all jazzed about finding a way to get it before the herd way back in October, it’s been a tough sell for me. But Vadim has some points for using Facebook as a journalist. It’s a great way to shamelessly self-promote because your non-journalist friends will still like you – probably. And now that Facebook’s becoming the favorite of the Washington Post staff, there’s good reason to delete my partying pictures and post more stories.

Mashable this week gave 7 ways journalists could use the site Pinterest. Frankly, after waiting three days for an invite to join I’m at a loss. If I blogged about interior design, cooking, baking, pretty things in general, Pinterest might be of interest to me. Maybe if I were a photographer, things would be different. Or if I really cared to make picture “boards” of my interests so others could better know my work. But until I master the camera that usually gathers dust on my dresser, Pinterest will stay on the back burner.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m relatively upbeat on journalism and social media and finding the point where the two do wonders for each other. I’m just learning to not jump on board with the next new thing I hear about.

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Introduction

It doesn’t take a news junkie to notice the twists and turns in the media industry today. What it does is a close analysis on how people cover information, how technology is turning the industry upside down and how everyone – not just journalists – are able to be increasingly involved in the processes of newsgathering and information sharing.

For a purist and a news junkie like myself, this media revolution is both fascinating and confusing. I used to resist giving bloggers and anything that wasn’t a traditional print or broadcast organization much credit because I saw questionable practices being used. In reality, I was giving the old guards too much credit and it’s wrong to ignore the power bloggers (Brian Stelter and Nate Silver come instantly to mind) and committed Tweeters have , and they assets they give to existing news outlets.

I am a senior journalism student at Northeastern University who has worked for both student newspapers, small local newspapers and online-only publications. Working in companies of various sizes and structures has allowed me to see the successes and struggles different approaches to media face today. And as a journalism student, it’s immensely interesting. Thanks to Twitter, I spend a lot of time following the headlines, monitoring everything from traditional newspapers like The New York Times and Los Angeles Times, to online firms like Slate.

Don’t get me wrong, print still has a place in the media landscape. But sitting back and blogging during this industry’s world during a revolution is a thrill.

 

 

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