Journalism in China is “almost like playing a video game”

Wu Nan, March 29, at Northeastern University

Based on Nieman fellow Wu Nan’s testimony about her work in Chinese journalism, being a reporter in that country has similar appeal as eating fire. Remember, some people like that stuff.

Wu’s work at various sites, including The Wall Street Journal’s Chinese site, gave her insight into the difficulty that nation’s reporters face in reporting every day news, she said to about 50 Northeastern students. She also said the emergence of social media in the area, from Facebook and Twitter knockoffs, has become crucial to the reporting process.

Wu’s roughly 35-minute discussion was kind of insider journalism discussion, but her experience reflected her talent in navigating censorship and disclosure restrictions, something journalists in every state have to face. But she described it as kind of a thrill, suggesting, to me anyway, she was interested in reporting that was challenging.

As China increasingly becomes a more important country, it makes sense to understand the ability of their reporters in covering the national news. On the face of it, it sounds like China embraces citizen journalism because it’s already a backbone of the journalism scene there.

Wu doesn’t mind, though. She thinks Chinese journalism is like a maze in a video game – and a great challenge.

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